View Cart You may change your account settings, including your Billing & Shipping Addresses, Credit Card Information, as well as Express Checkout status.
Doctors Foster and Smith LiveAquaria
  Welcome to LiveAquaria.com! 
HOME    HELP    CONTACT US    MY ACCOUNT    SIGN IN
LiveAquaria.com - Quality Aquatic Life Direct To Your Door. LiveAquaria.com - Quality Aquatic Life Direct To Your Door.
SEARCH

Free Shipping on Orders Over $225
Diver's Den - WYSIWYG Fish, Corals, Inverts & More
Weekly Specials
Aquarium Supplies
LiveAquaria.com Rewards Program

resources
Shipping Rates & Info
How to Order
We're here to help:
- Email Us
- 1-800-334-3699
100% Guarantee
Compatibility Chart
Acclimation Guide
Ideal Water Parameters
Always Quarantine New Arrivals
Articles & Information

features
Beginners Area
Build Your Own Reef Cleaner Packages
Certified Captive Grown Corals - 30 day guarantee!
Collector's CornerĀ®
FREE Catalogs
Email-Only Specials
YouTube Twitter Connect with Us!
Facebook

Video Center
MACNA 2014
Freshwater Fish Pond Fish Pond Plants Live Foods Freshwater Inverts Freshwater Plants
Marine Fish Corals Live Rock Reef Cleaner Packs Marine Inverts Marine Plants

Aiptasia Control Options



Aiptasia Control Options
Most saltwater enthusiasts at some point in their hobby experience have had to deal with the Aiptasia anemone. In this two-part series on Aiptasia, we discuss how this hardy and survival-oriented organism is able to thrive in your aquarium and the different methods you can use for its removal.

removing the pest
Any saltwater aquarist that has had to deal with the pesky Aiptasia anemone knows first-hand how difficult it can be to rid your aquarium of the hardy survivor. But since Aiptasia won't pack up and leave on their own, it's up to you to bid them goodbye.

Aiptasia Control Options: Peppermint Shrimp (Lysmata wurdemanni)
Aiptasia Control Options: Copperband Butterflyfish (Chelmon rostratus)
say goodbye to aiptasia
The first thing you can do is limit the Aiptasia's chances to thrive. Target feed your fish and corals to avoid letting the Aiptasia steal any food. Although Aiptasia contain their own energy-forming zooxanthellae, feeding them additional nutrients won't help matters.

Next, develop a plan of attack. Many hobbyists attempt to remove Aiptasia physically, but that often creates only more polyps, and thus, more problems. A safer approach is to first invest in some natural Aiptasia predators.

natural aiptasia predators
Peppermint Shrimp (Lysmata wurdemanni) are a popular tool against Aiptasia. Make sure that you purchase the Lysmata wurdemanni and not its Pacific cousins, Lysmata Californica and Rhynchocinetes durbanensis, which are less interested in Aiptasia. Keep in mind that not all Peppermint Shrimp will be interested in the anemones, either.

The Copperband Butterflyfish (Chelmon rostratus) is also helpful against Aiptasia, but may also pick on clams, sessile invertebrates, feather dusters, or other anemones in the aquarium. Research the recommended conditions for keeping the Copperband Butterflyfish and Peppermint Shrimp on LiveAquaria.com before adding to your aquarium.

Although difficult to find in the hobby or keep alive in an aquarium environment, the Berghia nudibranch (Berghia verrucicornis) is a proven consumer of Aiptasia. They are very small (10-14 mm), nocturnal, and can take months to develop into a successful Aiptasia-eating colony, but can reduce Aiptasia populations significantly or entirely over time.

a safe, chemical approach
The safest chemical option of Aiptasia control is through the use of an aquarium-safe calcium hydroxide solution (Kalkwasser) injected into the Aiptasia polyp via a hypodermic needle or pasted onto the mouth of the anemone. Be aware that adding calcium hydroxide can increase the pH in the aquarium depending on the amount used and the water volume of the aquarium, so keep an eye on water parameters.

a safe, chemical-free approach
One chemical-free way to control Aiptasia is to inject scalding hot RO water into the polyp with a hypodermic needle. The hot water effectively kills the Aiptasia. Lemon juice may also be used to inject the Aiptasia.

Part one in this series introduced Aiptasia, and explained how they survive in your tank.

 

Click here for a more printer-friendly version of this article.   Click here for a PDF version of this article.   Bookmark and Share

 


 

 
FREE Email Newsletters - Sign up for weekly email-only specials & more:
help
CONTACT US
SHIPPING RATES
SHIPPING SCHEDULE
HOW TO ORDER
TRACK YOUR ORDER
REWARDS PROGRAM
 
about us
WHO WE ARE
AQUATIC SPECIALISTS
CUSTOMER COMMENTS
100% GUARANTEE
DIVER'S DEN HELP
 
services
GIFT CERTIFICATES
BUSINESS PARTNER PROGRAM
EMAIL NEWSLETTERS
PAY PAL CREDIT    PAY PAL®
WI Facility OPEN HOUSES
   
Visit our other websites:
DrsFosterSmith.com
PetEducation.com

bizrate Customer Certified Site - LiveAquaria.com Reviews at Bizrate Drs. Foster & Smith BBB Business Review McAfee Secure sites help keep you safe from identity theft, credit card fraud, spyware, spam, viruses and online scams

Visit our Retail Store  |   Tell a Friend About Us  |   Link to Us  |   Site Map  |   FREE Catalogs
Freshwater Fish | Pond Fish | Pond Plants | Brackish Fish | Freshwater Inverts | Freshwater Plants
Marine Fish | Corals | Live Rock | Tank Cleaners | Marine Inverts | Marine Plants | Diver's Den | Collector's Corner |

Copyright © 1997-2014, Foster and Smith, Inc. - 2253 Air Park Road, P.O. Box 100 Rhinelander, Wisconsin 54501 All rights reserved. Read our Terms of Use here. See our privacy policy here.
DFS21